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The Benefits of Expungement in Oregon

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The Benefits of Expungement in Oregon

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In a nutshell: The punishment for criminal conviction, or even arrest, does not end when a person completes their formal sentence or probation. Oregon is part of a large minority of states that allow expungement, or relief from the continuing effects of a criminal record. If you or a loved one has a criminal history, they should contact us to take advantage of this legal benefit.

Why expunge your criminal record? 

One purpose or byproduct of our criminal system is to shame or stigmatize those convicted of a crime.

Because the U.S. is #1 when it comes to incarcerating its citizens, more and more people live with this “badge”. Further, technology has made checking criminal records much easier. Expungement (commonly called) is the legal relief offered to remove this stigma and day-to-day “disability”.

About 30 states don’t allow any convictions to be expunged. Oregon does. It’s something you or your loved ones should take advantage of.

…technology has made checking criminal records much easier. Expungement (commonly called) is the legal relief offered to remove this stigma and day-to-day “disability”.

 

 

 

 

 

The benefits of Oregon expungement 

The chief benefit of expungement is that the stigma is removed. People are thus less likely to suffer prejudice (lit., being pre-judged) by others because of a legal classification (e.g., “felon”). There is also a psychological, internal benefit that is very palpable, though not really quantifiable — the value of having your reputation restored, legally speaking. And not having to endure being branded as a “felon” or “someone who has been to jail or prison”, and so forth.

After expungement, the event legally didn’t happen, the criminal punishment didn’t happen, and you’re no longer stigmatized — at least as far as Oregon law is concerned. You’re on a level playing field with others as far as criminal history is concerned.

Sometimes even people who aren’t automatically prejudiced against those who have criminal events in their past have their hands tied. For example, some companies don’t want to be sued for “negligent hiring”. So a person is merely a victim of an impersonal system.

Common ways that a criminal record can interfere with your day-to-day life

You’d be surprised how often criminal records interfere with a person’s ability to live day-to-day. Here is a list of common areas:

  • When you’re trying to find a job, be promoted, or advance your career or continue a profession that requires licensing.
    • About 40 states allow employers or occupational licensing agencies to ask about arrests (even those that you were not convicted). And they can refuse to hire you if you have a criminal record.
    • Unfortunately this often comes at the worst time—when employers are looking to lay off people or have an excess of job applicants because of high unemployment.
    • Society of HR Management estimates almost 75% of employers run background checks on all employees. In the past, it used to be only certain jobs, such as child care or handling of money.
  • When you’re trying to find a place to live.
  • When you’re trying to attend college and receive financial aid.
  • When you’re trying to start you own business and receive a small-business loan.
  • When you’re trying to volunteer in your community or engage in activities at schools.
    • Many schools won’t allow you to volunteer at the school or participate in field trips of your children, grandchildren if you have a criminal record.
  • When you’re entering or exiting another country or dealing with border patrol or customs.
  • When you’re buying a firearm or seeking to carry a concealed weapon.
  • When you’re applying for or looking to renew for most occupational or professional licenses or security clearance.
  • When you’re applying for some forms of governmental aid, such as:
    • Food Stamps
    • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
    • Public housing
  • When you’re seeking to serve as an adoptive or foster parent or work in certain areas of child care.
  • When you’re seeking to vote.
    • Even though in Oregon you can vote after serving your time and while on parole or probation, many states limit the right to vote, including some, which ban voting for the rest of your life.

Hire an expungement lawyer

One of Essent Law’s passions is assisting persons to recover from past mistakes and reclaiming their good standing. Contact us regarding your or a loved one’s expungement, information, assistance, and counsel.

Essent Law offers offers Oregon Expungement services in Marion, Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas, Lane, and other counties, including the cities of Portland, Salem, and Eugene and surrounding areas.

After expungement, the event legally didn’t happen, the criminal punishment didn’t happen, and you’re no longer stigmatized — at least as far as Oregon law is concerned.


 

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